Tag Archives: data processing

12 corrections in a row

Just a couple of housekeeping notes: I’m giving talks in Europe in a month at the following locations: Unité Matériaux et Transformations (UMET), Lille on May 16, hosted by Grégory Stoclet, Birmingham University, Birmingham on the 20th of May, hosted by Zoe Schnepp, Nottingham University, Nottingham, on the 23rd of May, hosted by Philip Moriarty, […]

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Data processing flowchart and news on an old publication

Short news first; by going through the motions and waiting for Elsevier to get back to me, I have gotten permission (for the royal sum of 0.00 eurodollars) to repost one more paper from Polymer on my site. So that has now gone in the 2010 publications page here. Then it is time to give […]

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capillary self-absorption paper highlight, and new video

Dear scatterers, Those of you who have been reading this weblog for a while now, may remember the calculation of the sample self-absorption correction for plate-like samples. The result of this was a straightforward equation which could be used to correct the scattering of strongly absorbing samples (>30%) with a plate-like geometry. It was mentioned […]

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Detail-preserving 2D binning, part 1: the appetizer

(Sorry about the hiatus, there’s been a period filled with that noblest of Japanese traditions: paperwork!) If you want to do fitting of a 2D image, you want to preserve the information in the entire image. 2D fitting is quite computationally intensive, so you still want to reduce the number of pixels in your images. […]

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More statistics and change of job

Hello dear readers, As a followup on my previous story, a colleague of mine sent me this paper that helps explain the standard deviation, standard error and confidence intervals. A useful, and funny read: Click here. The second noteworthy item is that I have, as of November 1st, started working at the National Institute for […]

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Everybody hates statistics…

Everybody hates statistics [1]…   … but it can be of major importance in our small angle world. While very few papers on small-angle scattering discuss statistics, they can tell you whether your observations are real or just imaginary. In addition, statistics will let you know whether you have been able to describe your scattering […]

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