Presentations

Travel part 1: York and Leeds

2014/05/15 // 1 Comment

York and Leeds, the first 40% of the presentations all done. Still to go: Lille, Birmingham and Nottingham, and a few synchrotron days in between. Read on for the experiences at the first two [...]

Back from holiday and SAS2012

2012/12/08 // 0 Comments

SAS2012 turned out to be quite amazing, and I had a blast! After the conference some weeks were spent on holiday and therefore this site did not get updated. There should be new stuff coming up in a week. [...]

Lessons in outreach to be learned from Japan’s disasters

2011/03/21 // 3 Comments

(warning: this rather lengthy piece may contain personal opinions and has little to do with small-angle scattering. There is a nice bit about graphics, though.)   In the wake of the global public panic following the reporting around the nuclear reactor struggles (as opposed to the expected >15 kilopeople deaths in Myagi prefecture due to the tsunami alone), perhaps it is time for us to consider what we can learn from the way the media and the educated dealt with these developments. For us, it can be used to gain insight into how to communicate with journalists, and we can come up with ideas about what we (the (educated) public) could do better in this situation. In summary, the following events happened in rapid succession: After the initial strike of an earthquake with its epicenter off the coast of north-east Japan, a tsunami struck the coast of north-east Japan (but fortunately not entering Tokyo Bay), wiping out some villages along the coastline and causing the large [...]

Live Fourier transform

2011/02/03 // 8 Comments

During some recent presentations, I have used a small matlab program giving me a live Fourier transform of the laptop camera input. It can be used in combination with some printed “structures” to show what we would see on a SAXS or WAXS detector. The idea is not mine, I heard that it was used by dr. Henrik Lemke for his Ph.D. defense to show the effects of lattice strain on the diffraction pattern. It turns out to be quite popular with the audience so far, so I will post the code for Matlab running on a macbook Pro here. Feel fee to use the code. I will also make a short movie showing one example of how to use it. I am sure you can think of many other useful purposes for it! The package is here: FT_cam_package Since it is so specific in its application, there is no documentation. Also, run “FTcamdemo” and the rest should be quite self-explanatory in the GUI that comes up. This package uses (and comes with) camera image capture code (Java) by Kalle Kempe and [...]

Notes on Guinier

2011/01/02 // 2 Comments

…well, his famous SAXS analysis method. This documentGuinier_short, copyright Brian Pauw gives a short description and review of the applicability of the Guinier method to polydisperse systems. It also shows, through analysis of simulated data, what q-range should be measured for the Guinier method to be valid. In short, the rule of qmax=1.3/Rg still holds, but Rg in polydisperse systems is the volume-squared weighted Rg of the distribution. This then implies that the Guinier method for polydisperse systems quickly becomes unusable as the required qmax cannot be reached with anything but USAXS systems for polydisperse samples. This text (the linked PDF) is released under copyright (copyright by Brian R. Pauw, 2011) as I may want to include some of this in a later publication. I hope you [...]

More Youtube videos

2010/10/31 // 0 Comments

So, I could not do what I promised last time, the Monte-Carlo fitting works on perfect simulated scattering patterns but is as of yet unable to deal with the addition of a flat background. So I will have to take a raincheck. In the mean time, I have made two videos (part 1 and part 2) together with some colleagues during my time in Denmark. The video demonstrates small-angle scattering using laser light scattering on a hair. In part 2, the diameter of the hair is calculated. (I watched too many Carl Sagan videos and I am impressed and encouraged by them…) Check out the videos: Part one: Part [...]

Teaching and how it applies to us.

2010/08/22 // 0 Comments

We teach. Every one of us. If we have a classroom of students, it is obvious, but also when we talk to colleagues, we sometimes try to teach them something (even if it is only our point of view). I spoke last time about the teaching horrors that modern textbooks have. Well, this video by Dan Meyer explains why the textbooks are absolutely not helping to teach by asking the questions wrong, and he proposes an alternative way to pose the questions. He also, by the way, has a nice blog full of examples of how to get a class of students to actually think. This gets me thinking. How can we apply this to our presentations? Are we really engaging our audience by starting with a “talk outline”, or should we pose the final question as simple as possible and work from there? I will be experimenting with this and I will let you know how it [...]
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