Tag Archives: Science

Public day demonstration

I think it is safe to say that “everyone” is familiar with electron microscopy for looking at small things, but the same cannot be said for small-angle scattering. Introducing more people to the wonderful world of small-angle scattering may be one of the ways of getting more support for and interest in the technique. With […]

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New video: Introducing Dr. Martin Hollamby

I finally managed to find some time to make a video about Dr. Martin Hollamby and his work. Please check it out! (Also available on the ResearchSEA/AsiaResearchNews website here: Martin’s Magical Molecules)  

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TEDxTsukuba

(just a quick post about interesting things to keep the blog alive. More interesting developments are afoot, I hope to be able to post about them shortly) I suspect that all of the readers here are familiar with the wonderful resource of fascinating talks that is TED.  Yesterday, a group of people had their first […]

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Live Fourier Transform for Windows

[Ed: a new, completely rewritten version of this code can be found here, with a precompiled Windows version available at the bitbucket site courtesy of Joachim Kohlbrecher] Since entering paternity leave, I have had little time to come up with something new to post here. However, one colleague was so kind as to send me […]

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Book review: Ben Goldacre’s “Bad Science”

Hi all. Last week-end, while visiting friends nearby, a copy of the book “bad science” by Ben Goldacre was dropped in my lap. Having read the occasional post on his weblog (http://www.badscience.net/), I had already planned to get it. So I started reading the book with rather high expectations. (This copy, if I did not misunderstand […]

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Gamma rays from synchrotrons, an interview with dr. Daté

There is something quite “evil genius” about shooting an electron beam with a laser, especially for non-physicists like me. That this causes gamma rays to emerge (back towards the laser) is perhaps even more interesting. Allow me to elaborate in slightly more scientific terms.

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